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News: June, 2017

Genetics of lung cancer survival

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

African-Americans are more likely to die from lung cancer than whites and yet few studies of possible genetic factors that contribute to this disparity have been conducted. Melinda Aldrich, Ph.D., MPH, and colleagues conducted a first-of-its-kind genome-wide association study of lung cancer survival in 286 African-Americans enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study. Reporting recently […]

Patients with blood disorders invited to free June 24 seminar

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Patients with aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and other blood disorders are invited to a free seminar featuring a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinician and other medical experts. The free event will be Saturday, June 24, from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs, 700 Cool Springs […]

STINGing combination for cancer

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) are intracellular messengers produced in bacteria that can bind to and activate an immune-mediated signaling cascade called STING in mammalian cells. CDNs have shown antitumor activity in melanoma and breast tumors. Reporting this month in the journal Head & Neck, Young J. Kim, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Otolaryngology at Vanderbilt University, […]

Hackett elected to leadership role for national cancer group

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Lauren Hackett, MPA, executive director of Administration and chief business officer for Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), has been elected to serve on the Finance Committee for the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Lauren Hackett, MPA Founded in 1995, the NCCN is a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers, including VICC, devoted to patient care, research and […]

PET imaging to predict tumor response

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

About 10 percent of patients with colorectal cancer express a mutated form of the signaling molecule BRAF, which may be targeted for treatment by selective BRAF inhibitors. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging using a standard glucose probe is not able to predict response to BRAF inhibitors. In addition to becoming dependent on glucose, cancer cells […]

Repriming replication roadblocks

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Damage to DNA can stall the machinery that faithfully replicates DNA from cell to cell. Failed DNA replication can have health consequences such as cancer. An ancient primase polymerase – PrimPol – helps the replication machinery skip over common lesions and restarts DNA synthesis by “repriming” further away from roadblocks. Now in a study published […]

VICC racers compete in downtown bed race for cancer research funding

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Staff members from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) garnered an impressive second place finish in last month’s Downtown Derby Bed Race competition. The annual event which raises funds for the T.J. Martell Foundation featured teams that built and decorated their own “beds” to race up 5th Avenue to Bridgestone Plaza in downtown Nashville. The VICC team, […]

Coffey lands major NCI award to support colorectal cancer research

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Vanderbilt’s Robert Coffey Jr., M.D., has received an Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) — more than $6.6 million over seven years — to support studies aimed at advancing the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), a leading cancer killer. Robert Coffey Jr., M.D. Coffey, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and […]

Pal to lead VICC Cancer Health Disparities program

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Clinical geneticist Tuya Pal, M.D., has joined Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) as associate director of Cancer Health Disparities. Pal also has been named an associate professor of Medicine and Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research. Tuya Pal, M.D. As one of the faculty in the Vanderbilt Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Pal will focus on clinical and […]

Project reveals importance of cancer gene mutation testing

Friday, June 9th, 2017

An international genomic data-sharing consortium has analyzed nearly 19,000 patient genomic records and found that testing of patient tumors for relevant gene mutations often provides a roadmap for the use of effective therapies. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange (GENIE) is a multi-phase, multi-year data-sharing project launched in 2015 […]

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