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News: September, 2018

Team’s potential lung cancer therapy lands award from SBIR

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

A potential cancer drug aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of ionizing radiation in lung cancer patients is a step closer to development with funding support from the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Cancer Moonshot award to help map tumor progression

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

A trans-institutional team of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University has received an $11 million Cancer Moonshot grant to build a single-cell resolution atlas to map out the routes that benign colonic polyps take to progress to colorectal cancer.

Diabetes drug may prevent cancer

Friday, September 21st, 2018

A drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes might help prevent patients from developing liver cancers, according to a recent study by Harvey J. Murff, MD, MPH, and colleagues.

Chic Awearness event supports VUMC ovarian cancer research

Friday, September 21st, 2018

The T.J. Martell Foundation’s 6th Annual Chic Awearness fundraising event that supports ovarian cancer research at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) will be held Monday, Sept. 24, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., at Analog at the Hutton Hotel, 1808 West End Ave.

Study tracks incidence, timing of immunotherapy-related deaths

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have answered questions about the incidence and timing of rare but sometimes fatal reactions to the most widely prescribed class of immunotherapies.

Using light to fight GVHD

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Vanderbilt investigators have conducted a prospective multicenter study on how extracorporeal photopheresis works in treating chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) — a complication of bone marrow or stem cell transplant that occurs when donor cells attack the recipient.

Energetic gene switch

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Vanderbilt researchers have identified a previously undetected type of histone modification that may have implications for cancer and other conditions.

A brain-builder called “Shh”

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

The Sonic hedgehog protein plays a crucial role in the development of brain cells that may be the source of some types of pediatric brain tumors, a recent study reports.