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News: Cancer News

Photo: Cancer screening

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

Sarah Rohde, M.D., assistant professor of Otolaryngology, checks Emery Reed for symptoms of potential head and neck cancer. Vanderbilt University Medical Center physicians recently provided free cancer screenings for 116 patients at the Odess Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Clinic and the Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System.  

VICC research efforts in spotlight at AACR conference

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

Adding an investigational drug to an already approved estrogen blocking therapy appears to be safe and provided clinical benefit for some postmenopausal women with estrogen-positive breast cancer. The research led by Ingrid Mayer, M.D., associate professor of Medicine and clinical director of the Breast Cancer Program at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), was selected for the […]

VICC at Franklin adds new radiation therapy technology

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

The Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) at Franklin has added new technology to enhance treatment for patients needing radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation. The newly installed TrueBeam linear accelerator provides more accurate targeting of the radiation beam to focus on the cancer or lesion and enhanced protection for the adjacent tissue. VICC at Franklin is […]

Cates lands grant to study desmoid tumor genetic factors

Friday, April 17th, 2015

The Desmoid Tumor Research Foundation (DTRF) has awarded Justin Cates, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, with one of its five research grants for his work studying growth/recurrence determinants related to genetic factors in desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF) patients. Desmoid tumors are rare tumors that can form in the connective tissues of virtually […]

Statin use improves renal cell cancer survival

Friday, April 17th, 2015

A new study led by Vanderbilt University investigators found that patients being treated with statins at the time of surgery for kidney cancer, also known as renal cell carcinoma, had improved overall survival and disease-specific survival. Drugs known as statins are widely used to lower cholesterol and previous studies have indicated that they could be […]

Cancer signaling pathway blocker

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have discovered a new way to inhibit Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, an important regulatory pathway for vertebrate development – and cancer. Abnormal regulation of this pathway leads to several human malignancies, including small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer, and therefore it is a potential drug target for cancer. Small molecules have […]

Micelle “packets” deliver cancer drugs

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules can suppress tumor growth and target cells otherwise untreatable by conventional therapeutics, but targeted, intracellular delivery is a significant limitation to siRNA translation. To deliver the siRNA molecules into tumor cells, researchers have packaged them in micelles that express folic acid, which is internalized by cancer cells that overexpress folate […]

NCI report shows U.S. cancer deaths on decline

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

The death rates for most forms of cancer continue to decline at a modest pace among men, women and children in the United States, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer 1975 – 2011. The report from the National Cancer Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health, […]

New driver behind lung cancer progression

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators have identified the mechanisms used by a gene and its binding protein to drive tumor growth in several forms of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer. In a report published online recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), first author Jun Qian, Ph.D., lead investigator Pierre Massion, M.D., […]

‘Docking stations’ on chromosomes new anti-cancer target

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered a cleft in a chromosome-binding protein that may hold the key to stopping most cancers in their tracks. The protein, WDR5, is a “docking station” for a family of transcription factors called MYC that is overexpressed in the majority of malignancies and which contributes to an estimated 100,000 cancer-related deaths […]

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