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    News: Cancer Research

    Switching breast cancer off

    Thursday, April 14th, 2016

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) – key regulators of cell signaling pathways – are commonly implicated in the proliferation of malignant tumors. The EPHA2 RTK is overexpressed in aggressive forms of breast cancer, and this overexpression correlates with poor patient outcomes. EPHA2 is believed to operate somewhat like a switch: when its ligand, ephrin-A1, is present, […]

    Pietenpol named Executive Vice President for Research

    Thursday, April 14th, 2016

    Jennifer Pietenpol, Ph.D., director of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, B.F. Byrd Jr. Professor of Molecular Oncology and Professor of Biochemistry, Cancer Biology and Otolaryngology, has been named Executive Vice President for Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). Her appointment is effective May 1. Pietenpol will assume this new role while continuing to serve as […]

    Pietenpol named to NCI Blue Ribbon Panel

    Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

    Jennifer Pietenpol, Ph.D., B.F. Byrd Jr. Professor of Oncology and director of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), has been selected to serve on a Blue Ribbon Panel that will inform the scientific direction and goals at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) for Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative. The announcement was made by the […]

    Cancer prevention and poverty

    Friday, April 1st, 2016

    Interested in how cancer prevention recommendations play out in low-income populations, epidemiologist Shaneda Warren Anderson, Ph.D., and colleagues analyzed data from 61,098 adults, with overrepresentation of low-income whites and African-Americans. The team measured adherence to American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations regarding body mass index, physical activity, diet, alcohol intake and smoking status, and they gathered […]

    New role identified for p73 gene

    Friday, April 1st, 2016

    The p53 gene is a tumor suppressor whose absence or silence contributes to cancer formation. Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators recently defined the role of a family member – p73. Using a p73-deficient mouse model developed in the laboratory of Jennifer Pietenpol, Ph.D., investigators led by Clayton Marshall found that p73 regulates at least 100 genes […]

    T.J. Martell Foundation lauds Pietenpol’s research

    Thursday, March 17th, 2016

    Jennifer Pietenpol, Ph.D., B.F. Byrd Jr. Professor of Oncology and director of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), was honored with the Medical Research Advancement Award during the 8th Annual T.J. Martell Foundation Nashville Honors Gala held recently at the Omni Nashville Hotel. The Medical Research Advancement Award is in recognition of Pietenpol’s career as a cancer researcher. […]

    Study suggests cancer’s ‘clock’ can be rewound

    Thursday, March 17th, 2016

    Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have “turned back the clock” in a mouse model of metaplasia — precancerous stomach lesions — raising hopes that gastric cancer, a worldwide scourge that’s rising in the United States, can be prevented. “This was totally unexpected,” said James Goldenring, M.D., Ph.D., the Paul W. Sanger Professor of Experimental […]

    ROCKs and cancer invasion

    Thursday, March 17th, 2016

    Cancers become fatal mostly because of their ability to spread. Cancerous cells migrate from primary tumors and invade neighboring tissues through protrusions called invadopodia. The rigidity of the cancerous mass, the tumor-associated extracellular matrix (ECM), drives malignant behavior through the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway. In particular, the ROCK protein is mutated and overexpressed in many cancers, […]

    A clue to cell cleavage

    Thursday, March 10th, 2016

    The final step of cell division is termed cytokinesis, a process that separates one cell into two. Cytokinesis is linked to events underlying cancer and the development of diverse cell types in the human body. The cytoskeleton, networks of filamentous proteins, is key for cytokinesis. Microtubules form a barrel-shaped array called the spindle midzone, which […]

    IOM study calls for better evidence for biomarker tests

    Thursday, March 10th, 2016

    Biomarker tests that help determine which patients may benefit from molecularly targeted therapies need better evidence and oversight to improve their effectiveness and availability, according to a study by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The study authors said the tests are not being uniformly adopted into […]

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