Skip to Content

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

 

E-Newsletter

  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent

    Archives

    Join Us

    News: Cancer Research

    Findings offer new insight on how cell division proteins work

    Thursday, January 28th, 2016

    A family of proteins with critical roles in cell division, synaptic transmission and cell migration don’t all function the way scientists thought they did, according to two new studies led by Vanderbilt researchers. Instead of bending membranes into tubes, these “F-BAR” proteins — named for a domain they share — appear to form patches on […]

    Study identifies new culprit in lung cancer development

    Thursday, January 28th, 2016

    A microRNA — a small piece of RNA involved in regulating gene expression — functions as an oncogene to drive the development of lung cancer, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. The microRNA, known as miR-31, is expressed at high levels in human lung adenocarcinoma, and its expression correlates with reduced patient survival, said Christine Eischen, […]

    VICC helps expand cancer patient’s treatment options

    Thursday, January 14th, 2016

    Edward (Ned) Wikle recently celebrated the Christmas holidays with his wife and three young children, a celebration the Jackson, Mississippi-based endodontist, U.S. Navy veteran and cancer patient wasn’t sure he would have. But research by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators and the discovery of a novel gene mutation in his tumor have given him more […]

    Copying chromosome caps

    Friday, January 8th, 2016

    DNA replication – the process of copying the DNA each time a cell divides – faces many sources of stress, such as DNA damage and sequences that are difficult to copy. A family of related enzymes, including SMARCAL1, responds to replication stress to stabilize, repair and restart stalled replication “forks.” David Cortez, Ph.D., and colleagues […]

    New lead for ovarian cancer treatment

    Friday, December 11th, 2015

    Despite increasingly advanced treatments, nearly half the women who contract ovarian cancer will die within five years. Chemotherapy drug resistance significantly contributes to the high mortality rate. Understanding the processes that trigger tumor growth allows scientists to find better ways to treat this disease. Members of the laboratory of Hal Moses, M.D., previously identified the […]

    Review highlights financial impact of sarcoma misdiagnosis

    Thursday, December 10th, 2015

    Malpractice awards and settlements are eight times greater when physicians misdiagnosis sarcoma than when they make other mistakes, according to a review of 32 years of court cases. For orthopaedic surgeons, the indemnity payments were 17 times higher. However, primary care physicians were more apt to be sued. The review is the latest effort by […]

    Ayers Institute spurred key cancer research gains

    Friday, November 13th, 2015

    In 2005, Tennessee philanthropists Jim and Janet Ayers gave $10 million to help Vanderbilt University scientists find early markers for colorectal cancer that could improve diagnosis and potentially save lives. Within nine years, the gift, which established the Jim Ayers Institute for Precancer Detection and Diagnosis at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), had yielded an […]

    Study helps clarify components of DNA ‘copy machine’

    Friday, November 13th, 2015

    Vanderbilt investigators have generated a “parts list” for the molecular machinery that duplicates DNA each time a cell divides. They were surprised to identify new proteins among the many that participate in copying DNA. “Imagine that; we’ve been studying DNA replication for 50 years, and we’re still finding new proteins that are required for replication,” […]

    Computer extracts cancer stage

    Friday, November 13th, 2015

    Cancer stage, an important element in prognosis, is often documented in narrative form in medical records, which leads to time-consuming abstraction by tumor registry personnel and other secondary users of these records. Jeremy Warner, M.D., M.S., and colleagues developed a computerized natural language processing algorithm to extract cancer stages from electronic medical records. Records from […]

    Investigators find clues to melanoma treatment resistance

    Friday, October 30th, 2015

    Nearly half of all patients with malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, have a mutation in the BRAF gene found in their tumors. Mutations in the BRAF gene turn on a cancer growth switch known as the MAP kinase pathway. In recent years, new drugs have been approved that target the BRAF/MAPK […]

    Next Page »« Previous Page

    E-Newsletter

  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent

    Archives

    Join Us