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    News: Cancer Research

    Grant spurs research into how cancer cells spread

    Friday, March 4th, 2016

    Aron Parekh, Ph.D., assistant professor of Otolaryngology, has received a four-year, $790,000 Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society to further his research into the mechanical and biological properties of cancer cells and the methods by which they leave the initial tumor and spread or metastasize to other parts of the body. “I am […]

    VICC treats first patient in Tennessee with novel cellular immunotherapy

    Monday, February 29th, 2016

    For the first time, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators have used a cancer patient’s own re-engineered immune cells to treat a form of blood cancer by stimulating the immune system. The new CAR-T investigational therapy (known as KTE-C19) is being studied in a clinical trial for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). The trial, called […]

    Chemo better option following pancreatic cancer surgery: study

    Thursday, February 25th, 2016

    A multicenter study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) investigators found that pancreatic cancer patients who underwent surgery and received chemotherapy lived longer and had fewer cancer recurrences in other parts of the body than patients who also received chemoradiation therapy. The study led by Alexander Parikh, M.D., MPH, associate professor of Surgery and […]

    Combining treatments for melanoma

    Monday, February 22nd, 2016

    Chemotherapy and targeted anti-cancer drugs can induce tumor cell senescence. Although cell proliferation is shut down in senescent cells, there is enhanced expression of secreted factors that may promote or suppress tumor growth. Anna Vilgelm, Ph.D., and colleagues explored how therapy-induced senescence impacts the therapeutic response of melanoma. Using mouse models, the researchers assessed gene […]

    Study explores less invasive way to monitor colorectal cancer

    Monday, February 22nd, 2016

    Investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have published research regarding an important feature of colorectal cancer (CRC) that could eventually lead to the development of non-invasive means of monitoring cancer progression. After lung cancer, CRC is the second-most lethal cancer in the United States. The team’s research, published in eLIFE, indicates that colorectal cancer cells […]

    Overcoming lung cancer drug resistance

    Thursday, February 11th, 2016

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Many lung cancer patients have mutations in the proteins regulating cell growth, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Tumors with EGFR mutations are initially extremely responsive to EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Unfortunately, tumors rapidly become resistant to […]

    Study identifies potential colon cancer biomarker

    Thursday, February 11th, 2016

    A protein that suppresses a key cancer pathway in the colon may be a potential biomarker for colitis-associated tumors, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center reported last month in the journal Gut. The protein, called blood vessel epicardial substance or BVES, also may be a new therapeutic target for cancers in the colon and elsewhere, […]

    Prostate cancer survivors’ risk of heart disease studied

    Thursday, February 4th, 2016

    The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease’s slow progression. What survivors need to be more concerned with is heart disease, the most common non-cancer cause of death for men with prostate cancer, according to […]

    Findings offer new insight on how cell division proteins work

    Thursday, January 28th, 2016

    A family of proteins with critical roles in cell division, synaptic transmission and cell migration don’t all function the way scientists thought they did, according to two new studies led by Vanderbilt researchers. Instead of bending membranes into tubes, these “F-BAR” proteins — named for a domain they share — appear to form patches on […]

    Study identifies new culprit in lung cancer development

    Thursday, January 28th, 2016

    A microRNA — a small piece of RNA involved in regulating gene expression — functions as an oncogene to drive the development of lung cancer, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. The microRNA, known as miR-31, is expressed at high levels in human lung adenocarcinoma, and its expression correlates with reduced patient survival, said Christine Eischen, […]

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