Skip to Content

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent


    Join Us

    News: Colorectal Cancer

    NCI report shows U.S. cancer deaths on decline

    Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

    The death rates for most forms of cancer continue to decline at a modest pace among men, women and children in the United States, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer 1975 – 2011. The report from the National Cancer Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health, […]

    Gene profile predicts metastasis

    Thursday, February 12th, 2015

    Gene expression profiling has been applied to predict metastatic recurrence, the leading cause of deaths in patients with colorectal carcinoma. However, the biological mechanism is not completely understood, driving poor clinical outcomes. To address this issue, Dan Beauchamp, M.D., Bing Zhang, Ph.D., and colleagues analyzed the 11 human microarray datasets from 1,295 tumor specimens as […]

    Protein “pockets” help ID cancer genes

    Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

    Somatic mutations, which can occur in any cell except sperm or egg, are not inheritable. Several recent studies have demonstrated that disease-causing mutations commonly alter protein folding, protein stability and protein-protein interactions. It has been difficult, however, to determine which somatic mutations identified in tumor samples “drive” the cancer development and which are just “along […]

    Study identifies genes tied to colon cancer

    Friday, August 22nd, 2014

    by Dagny Stuart Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death among populations around the world. While diet, physical activity and other lifestyle factors can influence the risk of developing the disease, hereditary factors also play an important role. Genetic factors identified to date explain only a small fraction of colorectal cancer (CRC), […]

    Colon cancer’s protein signatures identified

    Friday, July 25th, 2014

    by Bill Snyder A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein “signatures” of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation’s second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. The technological tour de force, described as the first integrated “proteogenomic” characterization of human cancer, was reported online this week by the journal Nature. It […]

    NIH Grant Supports Colon Research

    Friday, August 16th, 2013

    Robert Coffey Jr., M.D., Ingram Professor of Cancer Research at Vanderbilt University, has received a five-year, $5.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the role of extracellular RNA (ex-RNA) in colorectal cancer. Most RNA works inside cells to translate genes into proteins that are necessary for organisms to function. Now, recent […]

    Colon Cancer Added to Gene Mutation Testing

    Thursday, July 19th, 2012

    Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center has initiated tumor mutation testing for a limited number of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This pilot project for colorectal cancer is part of VICC’s Personalized Cancer Medicine Initiative (PCMI), a program to identify genetic mutations in a patient’s tumor that may be useful in matching the appropriate therapy with each patient. […]

    Going for the Gold

    Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

    Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center cordially invites you and your guests to join us for Going for the Gold: Living Well through Cancer! Due to an overwhelming response, we have closed registration. We are thrilled to have so many people attend! Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012 Time: 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Where: Vanderbilt University Student Life Center 310 […]

    Newly Identified Stem Cells May Hold Clues to Colon Cancer

    Thursday, March 29th, 2012

    Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified a new population of intestinal stem cells that may hold clues to the origin of colorectal cancer. This new stem cell population, reported March 30 in the journal Cell, appears to be relatively quiescent (inactive) – in contrast to the recent discovery of intestinal stem cells that multiply rapidly […]

    Colon Cancer’s Cellular Crossroads

    Friday, March 16th, 2012

    Colon cancer development and progression involves alterations in several cell signaling pathways. Activation of the Wnt pathway is involved in the early stages of tumor development, while inactivation of signaling through the TGF-beta pathway (which typically suppresses tumor formation) is involved in later stages. However, the interactions between these pathways remain unclear. R. Daniel Beauchamp, […]

    Next Page »« Previous Page


  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent


    Join Us