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News: Gastrointestinal Cancer

Glowing receptors help find and track cancerous growth

Friday, May 19th, 2017

Under the microscope, they sparkle like emeralds, these molecules that may hold a key to understanding — and stopping — cancerous growth. The molecules are protein receptors that bind epidermal growth factor (EGF). Overexpression of the EGF receptor has been linked to multiple types of cancer. Drugs that block the receptor have become routine treatment […]

VUMC to Study Potential Approach to Reverse Precancerous Stomach Lesions

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) cancer researcher James Goldenring, M.D., Ph.D., has received a two-year, $200,000 grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation in Pleasantville, New York, to begin clinical trials of a potential approach for reversing precancerous stomach lesions. Stomach cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide after lung, liver and colorectal […]

Study takes 3-D perspective on colorectal cancer

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Despite dramatic recent advances in treatment, colorectal cancer killed more than 49,000 Americans last year, according to the National Cancer Institute, making it the second most lethal malignancy after cancers of the lung and bronchus. Determined to reduce the death toll, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center recently put on their 3-D “glasses” and took […]

Improving therapies for GI tumors

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

The signaling protein Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is overexpressed in several cancer types and has diverse oncogenic functions, making it an attractive druggable cancer target. Wael El-Rifai, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring a role for AURKA in upper gastrointestinal cancers, which are characterized by poor patient survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Using in vitro […]

New target for chronic infection

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

The greatest risk factor for gastric cancer is chronic infection by the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. In a study in mice published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dana Hardbower, Keith Wilson, M.D., and colleagues found that macrophage activation has a critical role in regulating H. pylori colonization and gastric inflammation. Macrophages are […]

Metastatic pancreatic cancer ‘reprograms’ for malignancy

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Metastatic pancreatic cancer — cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths — changes its metabolism and is “reprogrammed” for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan. 16 in Nature Genetics. It may be possible to reverse the malignant reprogramming to treat metastatic pancreatic cancer, […]

Midgut neuroendocrine tumor prognosis

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Patients with small intestine neuroendocrine tumors often have mesenteric tumor deposits (MTDs) in the abdomen – discrete tumor nodules that are not connected to the primary tumor. The clinical significance of these tumor deposits has not been thoroughly investigated, and they are not included in the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for […]

Study links lifestyle factors to formation of high-risk polyps

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Lifestyle factors like cigarette smoking and red meat consumption are known to be associated with an increased risk of colon polyps that can lead to colorectal cancer. Polyps are small growths on the lining of the colon, and while some polyps are harmless others can progress to cancer. A new study led by Vanderbilt University […]

EGF receptor found to regulate macrophage inflammation in gut

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

Researchers at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine have uncovered a link between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the inflammatory response to bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract. In particular, they have found — in mice and human tissue — that EGFR signaling regulates the response of an inflammatory macrophage (a type of white […]

Colon cancer awareness event set for Aug. 5

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

For some people cancer, especially colon cancer, is a persistent and potentially deadly visitor affecting family members from one generation to the next. Individuals who have a parent, sibling or child diagnosed with colon cancer have double the risk of developing the disease. But not all colon cancer is caused by hereditary factors. Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer […]

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