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News: Genome Maintenance Research Program

Correctly copying DNA

Friday, March 15th, 2019

A precise understanding of how the enzyme topoisomerase II cuts DNA could lead to better anti-cancer therapies.

Achilles’ heel for kidney cancer

Monday, March 4th, 2019

A recent study found that renal cell carcinoma cells with mutations in an enzyme-encoding gene, SETD2, were sensitive to a drug that inhibits the enzyme PI3K-beta.

Novel DNA repair mechanism preserves genome integrity: study

Monday, March 4th, 2019

Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a new DNA repair pathway that guards against genomic mutations. Their findings were published recently in the journal Cell.

The yin and yang of cell signaling

Thursday, February 14th, 2019

Changes in enzymes involved in lysophospholipid signaling can activate a pathway implicated in development of cancer, a recent study suggests.

Cell death pathway implicated in bone marrow failure

Monday, February 4th, 2019

Vanderbilt researchers have linked a specific form of programmed cell death to myelodysplastic syndrome, a type of bone marrow failure.

DNA’s on/off switch

Friday, January 18th, 2019

A recent study shows that a component of the DNA primase enzyme acts as a reversible on/off switch for DNA binding and represents a fundamentally new method of communication between DNA-processing enzymes.

Grant enhances study of new chemotherapy targets

Monday, October 22nd, 2018

Vanderbilt chemists have been awarded $7.2 million over the next five years from the National Cancer Institute to lead an initiative to better understand how a combination chemotherapy for breast cancer targets DNA.

Team’s potential lung cancer therapy lands award from SBIR

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

A potential cancer drug aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of ionizing radiation in lung cancer patients is a step closer to development with funding support from the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Energetic gene switch

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Vanderbilt researchers have identified a previously undetected type of histone modification that may have implications for cancer and other conditions.

Genetic balancing act

Friday, August 3rd, 2018

A recent study showing that protein called RADX helps regulate the process of DNA repair may help us better understand why some cancers are more or less resistant to certain therapies

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