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News: Genome Maintenance Research Program

Genetic balancing act

Friday, August 3rd, 2018

A recent study showing that protein called RADX helps regulate the process of DNA repair may help us better understand why some cancers are more or less resistant to certain therapies

Grant bolsters kidney cancer immunotherapy research

Friday, May 11th, 2018

Kimryn Rathmell, MD, PhD, Cornelius Abernathy Craig Professor of Medicine and director of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), has received a grant to research the role of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment for kidney cancer.

VICC study sheds new light on Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

Monday, March 12th, 2018

A new study by W. Kimryn Rathmell, MD, PhD, and colleagues, reveals a gene mutation’s role in Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, a genetically inherited disease which causes tumor growth in several organs.

Rathmell elected to ASCO nominating committee

Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

W. Kimryn Rathmell, MD, PhD, Cornelius A. Craig Professor of Medicine and director of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), has been elected to the nominating committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

DNA damage repair: molecular insights

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

The first line of defense against skin cancer is the ability to repair DNA damage caused by UV light. Walter J. Chazin, PhD, and colleagues investigated how XPA – a protein involved in the repair of certain DNA damage – interacts with DNA and the effects of several disease-associated mutations in XPA on its molecular structure and ability to bind DNA.

Radiation and pulmonary fibrosis

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis — tissue scarring that can permanently impair lung function — limits the delivery of therapeutic radiation doses to non-small cell lung cancer. To develop strategies for preventing or reducing fibrosis, Michael Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring the cell types and factors that contribute to the radiation-induced fibrotic response.

HDAC3 role in B-cell development

Monday, August 7th, 2017

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that modulate gene expression and have important roles in development and disease. HDAC inhibitors are active against lymphoma, and understanding the roles of specific HDACs is important for further therapeutic development. Scott Hiebert, Ph.D., and colleagues used a mouse model to explore the role of HDAC3 in the early development […]

Study identifies protein’s role in chemotherapy resistance

Friday, July 21st, 2017

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have discovered a protein that may lead to a new way to prevent resistance and improve outcomes for patients whose cancers have mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA2. The protein, RADX, is a DNA-binding protein. It regulates the activity of an enzyme called RAD51, which helps repair tumor-promoting […]

Repriming replication roadblocks

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Damage to DNA can stall the machinery that faithfully replicates DNA from cell to cell. Failed DNA replication can have health consequences such as cancer. An ancient primase polymerase – PrimPol – helps the replication machinery skip over common lesions and restarts DNA synthesis by “repriming” further away from roadblocks. Now in a study published […]

Vanderbilt’s W. Kimryn Rathmell named to ASCI leadership post

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

W. Kimryn Rathmell, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), has been named vice president of The American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI). W. Kimryn Rathmell, M.D., Ph.D. Rathmell, who is the Cornelius Abernathy Craig Professor of Medicine, will serve a four-year term, initially as vice president, then […]

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