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Cancer immunotherapy drugs linked with more serious heart effects

Monday, March 12th, 2018

Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have identified a growing number of serious and sometimes fatal cases of heart problems among cancer patients treated with some forms of immunotherapy.

A new target for neuroblastoma

Friday, February 16th, 2018

A new study by Dai Chung, MD, and colleagues reports that a protein, called SIRT6, plays an important role in the growth of neuroblastoma and suggests that SIRT6 may be a target for new therapeutics for the disease.

Study seeks to boost breast tumor immune response

Thursday, February 8th, 2018

Targeting specific molecules in breast tumors, called methylating agents, can turn up the immune response, potentially making tumors responsive to immunotherapy, suggests a new study published in Nature Communications.

Imaging features predict tumor grade

Monday, January 29th, 2018

A new study by Lola Chambless, MD, and colleagues shows that tumor volume is the most striking single predictor of tumor grade in atypical meningioma — aggressive tumors that form from the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The finding may help guide surgical planning and patient counseling.

VUMC researchers find a way to ‘starve’ cancer

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital nutrient glutamine.

Macara named ‘Pink Tie Guy’ for Komen breast cancer research

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

Ian Macara, PhD, Louise B. McGavock Professor and Chair of Cell and Developmental Biology and co-leader of the Signal Transduction and Chemical Biology Research Program at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), has been named one of the Pink Tie Guys for the Susan G. Komen Central Tennessee organization.

Research sheds light on how microtubules are assembled

Friday, January 5th, 2018

James Goldenring, MD, PhD and colleagues have made a fundamental advance in understanding how microtubules are assembled. Their finding, published as an Editor’s Pick last month in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, may lead to new ways to control cancer.

Searching out pancreatic cancer risk

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

A prospective study by Wei Zheng, Ph.D., M.D., and colleagues delivers the first direct epidemiological evidence that increased production of a chemical compound called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as measured by metabolites in urine (PGE-M), is associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk.

Radiation and pulmonary fibrosis

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis — tissue scarring that can permanently impair lung function — limits the delivery of therapeutic radiation doses to non-small cell lung cancer. To develop strategies for preventing or reducing fibrosis, Michael Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring the cell types and factors that contribute to the radiation-induced fibrotic response.

Study to explore cancer survivorship, sexuality

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) Assistant Professor Bethany Rhoten, Ph.D., MSN, R.N., has been awarded a $30,000 grant through a Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center-administered American Cancer Society pilot program to investigate the need for a self-report tool to assess sexuality in head and neck cancer patients.

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