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Searching out pancreatic cancer risk

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

A prospective study by Wei Zheng, Ph.D., M.D., and colleagues delivers the first direct epidemiological evidence that increased production of a chemical compound called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as measured by metabolites in urine (PGE-M), is associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk.

Radiation and pulmonary fibrosis

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis — tissue scarring that can permanently impair lung function — limits the delivery of therapeutic radiation doses to non-small cell lung cancer. To develop strategies for preventing or reducing fibrosis, Michael Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring the cell types and factors that contribute to the radiation-induced fibrotic response.

Study to explore cancer survivorship, sexuality

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) Assistant Professor Bethany Rhoten, Ph.D., MSN, R.N., has been awarded a $30,000 grant through a Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center-administered American Cancer Society pilot program to investigate the need for a self-report tool to assess sexuality in head and neck cancer patients.

Liquid biopsies help reveal lung cancer mutations

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

Cancer investigators led by researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center have co-developed a liquid biopsy blood-based assay used to identify specific gene mutations associated with the development or relapse of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC)

Researchers find novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugs

Friday, October 20th, 2017

The targeted anti-cancer therapies cetuximab and panitumumab are mainstays of treatment for advanced colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. However, many patients have tumors with genetic mutations that make them resistant to these anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies, or the cancers develop resistance during treatment.

Boosting sarcoma cell death

Friday, October 6th, 2017

A recent study by Dai Chung, M.D., and colleagues suggests new therapeutic options for Ewing sarcoma, a type of rare, aggressive childhood cancer.

VICC investigators land support from Komen Foundation

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Three breast cancer investigators from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) have been awarded research grants from Susan G. Komen, a nonprofit foundation devoted to supporting cancer research, community health outreach, advocacy and public policy initiatives.

Acid reflux cancer link

Sunday, September 17th, 2017

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, Alexander Zaika, Ph.D. and coworkers show that DNA damage in the esophageal cells caused by acidic bile reflux (BA/A) activates enzymes called NADPH oxidases in the mitochondria, the cell’s power house, to release highly reactive-oxygen species (ROS).

Pancreatic cancer development

Saturday, September 2nd, 2017

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal types of cancer, with new therapeutic options needed. Sergey Novitskiy, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues investigated the immune response during the development of aggressive PDAC in an animal model of the disease.

Fatty acids and adenoma risk

Monday, August 28th, 2017

Dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been associated with risk of colorectal cancer, with omega-6 PUFAs increasing and omega-3 PUFAs decreasing risk. Most studies, however, have relied on questionnaires to assess consumption of fatty acids, and results have been inconsistent. Harvey Murff, M.D., and colleagues have studied a blood-based biomarker of PUFA intake. […]

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