Skip to Content

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

 

News: Home Page Research

‘Docking stations’ on chromosomes new anti-cancer target

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered a cleft in a chromosome-binding protein that may hold the key to stopping most cancers in their tracks. The protein, WDR5, is a “docking station” for a family of transcription factors called MYC that is overexpressed in the majority of malignancies and which contributes to an estimated 100,000 cancer-related deaths […]

Mutations may predict melanoma response to immunotherapies

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

Melanoma patients whose tumors test positive for mutations in the NRAS gene were more likely to benefit from new immunotherapy drugs, according to a new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators. Douglas Johnson, M.D., assistant professor of Medicine, and Christine Lovly, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, are co-first authors […]

Cancer survival improvements vary by age, race

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

Improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment have led to longer survival for most cancer patients in the United States. However, the improvement in survival was substantially greater among younger patients and those who are white in most of the cancers studied, according to new research by Vanderbilt University investigators. The study was published online recently […]

Gene profile predicts metastasis

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Gene expression profiling has been applied to predict metastatic recurrence, the leading cause of deaths in patients with colorectal carcinoma. However, the biological mechanism is not completely understood, driving poor clinical outcomes. To address this issue, Dan Beauchamp, M.D., Bing Zhang, Ph.D., and colleagues analyzed the 11 human microarray datasets from 1,295 tumor specimens as […]

Yoga therapy for cancer patients studied

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Cancer is bad enough. But cancer patients who receive surgery, radiation and chemotherapy may suffer from side effects that run from irritating to crippling — problems that are postural, musculoskeletal and respiratory, along with lowered self-esteem. Many suffer from lymphedema, swelling caused by retained fluid in a compromised lymphatic system. One answer may be the […]

Data mining reveals cancer-driving genes

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

Prospecting for genes that might be implicated in cancer, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center research team has struck pay dirt. Zhongming Zhao, Ph.D., Peilin Jia, Ph.D., and colleagues use novel computational methods to sift through online repositories of molecular data gathered by cancer researchers worldwide. These results, and further analyses planned by the team, can […]

Enzyme affects tumor metastasis

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Breast cancer remains the most common type of cancer in females, with survival rates decreasing sharply for those with distant metastases. MMP2, a type of enzyme that degrades the extracellular matrix, has previously been implicated in the development of distant tumor metastases, but without a clearly defined role. In the Journal of Pathology, Barbara Fingleton, […]

Combo therapy may help fight melanoma

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Two therapies already in clinical development as single agents may work in combination to treat many subtypes of melanoma, a recent study suggests.

Potential Prostate Cancer Blood Test

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting “cell-free” tumor DNA in the bloodstream.

New insight on oral cancer culprits

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) treatments have been slow to advance despite the aggressive nature of these tumors that commonly metastasize. Models for the development of improved OSCC therapeutics have also been scarce. Thomas Andl, Ph.D., Claudia Andl, Ph.D., and colleagues previously observed coordinated loss of connective molecules (E-cadherin) and growth factor (TGFbeta) signaling in […]

Next Page »« Previous Page