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News: Research

A spicy finding

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Extracts of the plant turmeric — the spice that gives Indian curries a yellow color — have been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in traditional Asian medicine for centuries. Claus Schneider, PhD, and colleagues have discovered that curcumin (the active chemical compound in turmeric) is a “pro-drug” that is converted into reactive metabolites with anti-inflammatory activities.

Rising obesity rates in South leading to rapid increase in diabetes

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Rising obesity rates in several Southern states are leading to a rapid increase in new cases of diabetes among both black and white adults. A new study helmed by investigators at the University of Texas Health Science Center and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) found the risk of diabetes is double for black patients.

Study finds higher death rates in poor neighborhoods

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Living in an economically disadvantaged neighborhood is likely to lead to death at an earlier age, especially among African-Americans, new research shows. The death rate is even more pronounced among disadvantaged individuals with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

VUMC researchers find a way to ‘starve’ cancer

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital nutrient glutamine.

Macara named ‘Pink Tie Guy’ for Komen breast cancer research

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

Ian Macara, PhD, Louise B. McGavock Professor and Chair of Cell and Developmental Biology and co-leader of the Signal Transduction and Chemical Biology Research Program at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), has been named one of the Pink Tie Guys for the Susan G. Komen Central Tennessee organization.

Research sheds light on how microtubules are assembled

Friday, January 5th, 2018

James Goldenring, MD, PhD and colleagues have made a fundamental advance in understanding how microtubules are assembled. Their finding, published as an Editor’s Pick last month in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, may lead to new ways to control cancer.

DNA damage repair: molecular insights

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

The first line of defense against skin cancer is the ability to repair DNA damage caused by UV light. Walter J. Chazin, PhD, and colleagues investigated how XPA – a protein involved in the repair of certain DNA damage – interacts with DNA and the effects of several disease-associated mutations in XPA on its molecular structure and ability to bind DNA.

Searching out pancreatic cancer risk

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

A prospective study by Wei Zheng, Ph.D., M.D., and colleagues delivers the first direct epidemiological evidence that increased production of a chemical compound called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as measured by metabolites in urine (PGE-M), is associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk.

15 faculty members elected as AAAS fellows

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center members among fifteen Vanderbilt University faculty members elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science this year.

Radiation and pulmonary fibrosis

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis — tissue scarring that can permanently impair lung function — limits the delivery of therapeutic radiation doses to non-small cell lung cancer. To develop strategies for preventing or reducing fibrosis, Michael Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring the cell types and factors that contribute to the radiation-induced fibrotic response.

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