Skip to Content

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent


    Join Us

    News: Department of Defense

    Study Tracks How Gene May Promote Lung Cancer Tumors

    Friday, August 10th, 2012

    Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified how one of the genes most commonly mutated in lung cancer may promote such tumors. The investigators found that the protein encoded by this gene, called EPHA3, normally inhibits tumor formation, and that loss or mutation of the gene — as often happens in lung cancer — diminishes this […]

    Proteins May Point to Prostate Cancer Drug Targets

    Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

    Two proteins that act in opposing directions – one that promotes cancer and one that suppresses cancer — regulate the same set of genes in prostate cancer, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have found. The findings, reported recently in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, point toward potential drug targets and prognostic markers for prostate cancer. “We […]

    Wilms’ Tumors Differ in Developing Nations

    Friday, April 13th, 2012

    Diseases that are treatable in developed nations are often lethal in developing countries. For Wilms’ tumor, the most common childhood kidney cancer, survival rates in developed countries exceed 90 percent – but in developing nations, survival can be as low as 35 percent. Lack of adequate health care resources is largely responsible for this survival […]

    Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

    Friday, October 28th, 2011

    The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]

    Aging Protein Holds Breast Cancer Clues

    Monday, January 31st, 2011

    The most common type of breast cancer in older women — estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) positive breast cancer — has been linked to a protein that fends off aging-related cellular damage. A new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researcher David Gius, M.D., Ph.D., now shows how a deficiency in this aging-associated protein may […]