Skip to Content

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

 

E-Newsletter

  • Subscribe to our e-Newsletter to receive email updates:

  • Related Articles

    Most Recent

    Archives

    Join Us

    News: National Cancer Institute

    High Consumption of Vitamin E May Lower Liver Cancer Risk

    Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

    High consumption of vitamin E either from diet or vitamin supplements may lower the risk of liver cancer, according to a study published July 17 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The study was conducted by investigators from the Shanghai Cancer Institute, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute. Vitamin E is […]

    Uncommon BRAF Melanoma Mutation

    Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

    An uncommon mutation of the BRAF gene in melanoma patients has been found to respond to MEK inhibitor drugs, providing a rationale for routine screening and therapy in melanoma patients who harbor the BRAF L597 mutation. The new study by co-first-authors Kimberly Brown Dahlman, Ph.D., Junfeng Xia, Ph.D., and Katherine Hutchinson, B.S., Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center […]

    Kids’ Cells Okay After Maternal Cancer

    Friday, June 22nd, 2012

    Mitochondria – cellular structures known as the “power plants” of the cell – are inherited exclusively from the mother. These organelles contain their own DNA (mtDNA), which is highly vulnerable to damage by environmental insults – for example radiation exposure to the ovaries during treatment for childhood cancer. Because such damage could be passed on […]

    Gene Database to Aid Disease Research

    Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has dramatically accelerated the discovery of disease-associated genetic variants. Also known as massively parallel sequencing, this technological tour de force can rapidly “read” a sequence of DNA bases (the “letters” in our genomes) in parallel, making genome sequencing feasible in the research lab. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a “catalog” of human […]

    Roots of Childhood Brain Tumors

    Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

    Identifying the cellular origins of medulloblastoma – the most common malignant brain tumor in children – may help focus treatment on cell types responsible for tumor initiation. Previous research has linked Sonic hedgehog signaling in neuronal cell precursors within the developing cerebellum to medulloblastoma. Now, Chin Chiang, Ph.D., and colleagues demonstrate that “turning on” Sonic […]

    New Breast Cancer Gene Expression Identified

    Monday, June 11th, 2012

    A study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators has identified a gene expression pattern that may explain why chemotherapy prior to surgery isn’t effective against some tumors and suggests new therapy options for patients with specific subtypes of breast cancer. The study by lead author Justin Balko, Pharm.D., Ph.D., was published online June 10, 2012 […]

    Open House Slated for TPSR

    Thursday, May 24th, 2012

    The Translational Pathology Shared Resource (TPSR) has opened an expanded laboratory on the first floor of Medical Center North, room S-1310. To celebrate the grand opening of the newly renovated space, TPSR is hosting an open house on Wednesday, May 30, from 1-3 p.m. Vanderbilt faculty and staff are invited to tour the new space, […]

    New Drug Mutes More Melanomas

    Thursday, April 26th, 2012

    Therapies targeted to a specific mutation in the BRAF gene can significantly reduce tumor burden in metastatic melanoma. But these therapies are not suitable for melanomas lacking the mutation, and even tumors carrying the BRAF mutation eventually become resistant to those therapies. Using human melanoma tumors implanted into mice, Ann Richmond, Ph.D., and colleagues assessed […]

    Free Screening for Head and Neck Cancer

    Friday, April 20th, 2012

    The symptoms of head and neck cancer can be subtle, so to help catch the disease in its earliest stages the Tennessee Chapter of the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Meharry Medical College and the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System will offer […]

    Wilms’ Tumors Differ in Developing Nations

    Friday, April 13th, 2012

    Diseases that are treatable in developed nations are often lethal in developing countries. For Wilms’ tumor, the most common childhood kidney cancer, survival rates in developed countries exceed 90 percent – but in developing nations, survival can be as low as 35 percent. Lack of adequate health care resources is largely responsible for this survival […]

    Next Page »« Previous Page